Budget Wargaming

This hobby can be very expensive to say the least. Especially if you play GW Games. How can we keep costs down for both table top miniatures Games and board wargames?


Self made model of Mount Fuji, total cost: $3.00

A good friend pointed out that by buying figures at eBay or other auctions, the figs are only cheap if they ship from your country.

The gentleman at the Budgethammer Blog recommended a search like this for GW figures in order to get the best deals:

warhammer -bowl -rings -white -epic

He says:

“Firstly, it cancels out a number of words that tend to clog up Warhammer searches that I’m not personally interested in. “-bowl” gets rid of any Blood Bowl minis (I love Blood Bowl, don’t get me wrong, but I don’t like the old GW models and there’s a surprising amount of it on eBay), without hiding any Blood Angels stuff. “-rings” hide Lord of the Rings stuff, again of which there is a lot of. “-white” hides the Warhammer magazine, White Dwarf, and “-epic” hides all the Epic 40,000 stuff.
The search is set to ignore all Auctions and only display Buy It Now options. It hides all Business accounts/shops, only displaying Private sellers. Lastly, it orders it by Most Recently Listed.”


Ian Dickie in his book, “Wargaming on a Budget,” discusses things like:

“He offers sound practical advice on buying and building your armies (should you opt for metal, plastic, or even card, and in which scale?), gaming tables, terrain, buildings and even storage solutions. As well as purely financial constraints, Iain Dickie also recognizes the fact that available space is another major restriction for many gamers and tackles this issue too. Now you’ve got no excuse not to get wargaming!”

Indeed choosing plastic over metal, or a smaller scale such as 2mm over 28mm, both of these will save you money.


Irregular Miniatures is one of the cheapest if not the cheapest producer of metal miniatures. GW is perhaps the most expensive. Going for 20 mm soft plastic miniatures makes our hobby very cheap indeed.

The Wargamer online magazine has more ideas on keeping wargame costs down.

Rules:

There`s a plethora of free rules available for miniatures play from all periods.  Just do a web search for “free wargame rules,”  or “free table top miniatures rules,” something like that.  Many rule sets have been a labour of love by their author, and have been play tested over many years with friends and relatives.  Some of the free rules are actually better than the rules which are rushed out to make publishing deadlines by the major companies.  And frankly, the rules are what make or break the game.

Need a Budget Place to Stay in Japan?

 

 

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AI for Solo War games

AI for Solo War games

I have often espoused the opinion to much scoffing, that all table top war-games be they with figures or board war games, should include a solitaire system with good AI.   Most in the industry or simply people like me who love to play games usually disagreed.

Thankfully, these days, there are game designers, who share my feeling – Dan Versen and others feel the same way and back that up by including solo rules and challenging solo opponents.

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I have often thought: Would it be possible to make a solo AI for board war gamers, that was not only generic enough that it could be used with most games, but would be challenging too.

Do any of you know of such a system?

I would love to hear from you in the comments section  below.  Is there some kind of computer software that we could use?

jigg11.jpg

Years and years ago, I used to convert many of my board war games to the computer using the scenario editor of various computer war games I had.  Tanks was one of them,and Empire Deluxe was another.  The AI of the latter was not very good, so unless you played the vastly weaker side, it made for a boring game.

I would love to hear your comments below!

Visiting Japan? Check out the guests houses that are loaded with games!

On Using Colonial Diplomacy in the ESL Classroom

Colonial Diplomacy is a game by the Avalon Hill Game Company, a game I have known and loved for many years.

I had often wondered: was it a game I could use in the ESL classroom?

I researched others who had used this game with mixed results.

One problem with its use, seemed to the use of L1 during the game, rather than English. Another problem seemed to be the passivity of some of the students.   Read More

Coming to Japan? Want to see Mount Fuji? Check out Kevin`s Guest Houses!

Review of Settlers of Catan

A review of “Catan” (Settlers of Catan)

by Katsuya Michibata

It’s a board game. It’s made in the Federal Republic of Germany. Four players can play the game. All players aim to pioneer “Catan island”. First, all players build two houses and two roads on “Catan”. The phasing player throws the two dice. The sum of two dice’s numbers decides the resource produced. The players get the resources. Players can build a new house or a city or a new road from the resources. But if the sum of two dice’s number is seven, the robber appears. The robber steals player’s resources, and if a player has more than seven resources, players must throw away half the resources in hand. So, all players must notice the robber.
The game’s interesting thing is “negotiation”.
All players can negotiate with other players. It enables all players to exchange resources.

Read More

Ro Sato Plays Board Games in Tokyo, Japan

Ro Sato Plays Board Games in Tokyo, Japan
We know all about Japan, right? Land of high tech video games and consoles with no time for board games, right? You may be surprised …

This interview got delayed because in the midst of it Ro moved house. No problem. And because of it, Ro related his amusing experience, by which he can tell he is a true member of the species “gamer”:

Still busy busy, unpacking my games and settling in to the new apartment. It was kind of embarrassing to see almost half of my stuff in the boxes were board games! hehe We hired movers for the actual move, so movers were calling out what’s inside each box out loud and passing it over and it was like “board game coming!”, then another “board game coming”, “card game coming” … LOL

Q1. Once again, thanks a lot for agreeing to do this. Let’s start out by getting to know you. Can you share a little bit with the readers by introducing yourself, in which corner of the world you live, how you like to spend your time and also how you got started in games?

Ro Sato head shot
Ro Sato
Hi, my name is Ro Sato and I live in the heart of Japan, Tokyo. I am Japanese and my religion is soccer and I spend most of my time playing games or buying them. I have a little different background than a typical Japanese because I was educated in International School from kindergarten to high school. So my first gaming experiences are very much like those of any American. I’ve played Sorry, Clue, Monopoly, Diplomacy, and Risk. Aside from school, I’ve played Japanese board and card games too.

Read More

Those Canadians, eh

> > A Canadian Admiral was attending a naval conference that included Admirals
from the Canadian, US, English, Australian and French Navies.
At a cocktail reception, he found himself standing with a large group of
officers that included personnel from most of those countries. Everyone
was chatting away in English as they sipped their drinks but a French
Admiral suddenly complained that, whereas Europeans learn many languages,
North Americans generally learn only English. He then asked, ‘Why is it
that we always have to speak English in these conferences rather than
speaking French?’
Without hesitating, the Canadian Admiral replied ‘Maybe it’s because the
Brits, Canadians, Aussies and Americans arranged it so you wouldn’t have
to speak German.’
You could have heard a pin drop.

> > When Robert Whiting, an elderly Canadian gentleman of 83, arrived in Paris
by plane he took a few minutes to locate his passport in his carry on at
French Customs.
‘You have been to France before, monsieur?’ the customs officer asked sarcastically..
Mr. Whiting admitted that he had been to France previously.
The official replied, ‘Then you should know enough to have your passport ready.’
The Canadian said, ‘The last time I was here, I didn’t have to show it.’
‘Impossible, Monseur. Canadians always have to show passports on arrival
in France !’
The Canadian senior gave the Frenchman a long hard look. Then he quietly
explained, ‘Well, when I came ashore on D-Day in 1944 to help liberate
this country, I couldn’t find a single Frenchmen to show a passport to.’
You could have heard a pin drop.

> > Canadians are Cool.

–Sent via Tom Anderson